What

You Need to Know

Our programs reflect the aims of our covenant—To dwell together in peace, to seek the truth in love, and to help one another.”
Emphasizing curiosity, creativity, personal expression, mutual respect, environmental responsibility, and service. Our intention is not to tell our children what they must believe, but to give a variety of perspectives to promote personal confidence and to instill a deep respect for their own beliefs and the beliefs of others.

The mission of the All Souls Kids (ASK) is to foster the lifelong exploration of religious thought and values through a program that promotes spiritual development by means of free inquiry, mutual respect, and responsible behavior. ASK manages multiple programs at All Souls including Children’s Religious Exploration (CRE), Coming of Age, Youth Programs and Youth Groups.

We strive to welcome everyone regardless of race, culture, economic status, gender identity or sexual orientation. As an extension of this welcoming attitude, we call our children and youth by the name they prefer and use whatever gender pronouns they are most comfortable with. Our goal is to know and appreciate each individual person in our program.

What We Believe

Although Unitarian Universalism does not claim any religious doctrine as its supreme truth, our church covenant dictates how we conduct ourselves:

Love is the spirit of this church, and Service is its law.
This is our great covenant:
To dwell together in peace,
To seek the truth in love, and to help one another.

To make it possible to live out our covenant when we are in community, we have three simple Peace Practices:

  1. Be kind in word or deed.
  2. Respect yourself and all others.
  3. Everyone gets to play.

ASK is one way the All Souls community lives out its covenant:

In keeping with the non-creedal nature of All Souls and of Unitarian Universalism in general, ASK does not privilege any particular religious beliefs as absolute truth. Instead, we aim to present children with a full breadth of stories, ideas, and traditions from different peoples and religions around the world including our own contemporary culture. We hope you will bring your unique views to this kaleidoscope and share them with us so that we may gain a greater understanding of the whole.

Monthly Themes

September through May, our congregation is organized around monthly themes to help provide a shared focus. Members of our Worship Team introduce the themes on the first Sunday in services and offer further insight on our blog, beyondbelief.online. In addition, themes are explored in Touchstone Circle groups and in our children’s and youth programs.

This summer, we’ll explore our Peace Practices through our monthly themes.

  • June: Inclusion
    Everyone gets to Play

  • July: Respect
    Respect for yourself, others, and the environment

  • August: Kindness
    Kindness in word & deed

Children & Family

Children & Youth on Sunday

Children and Youth will begin in the Sanctuary for each service before being excused to their programs. Please check in at the Family Table when you arrive. Pre-register your children by emailing qscoggins@allsoulschurch.org

Children & Youth on Wednesday

We offer childcare for children 3 years old and potty trained through 5th grade. Enjoy dinner with your family, then let us take care of the kids while you enjoy a class.

Youth may gather in the Sponge Room, or enjoy one of our classes.

Family Chapel

Join Religious Educator Shannon Boston for a full, Family Chapel experience with hymns, songs, prayer, and children’s story related to our church-wide theme. Watch ON DEMAND from your YouTube Playlist

Unitarian Universalist Parents (UUPs)

Unitarian Universalist Parents (UUPs) is parents, grandparents, and caregivers working to support each other through what can be the hardest and most rewarding job known to humankind. Come share in the joy and the misery, compare notes, and find fellow travelers. 

UU Superhero Comic Camp

August 8-13, 2022
1 to 4 pm

Campers create their own SUPERHERO, while learning about real life UU SUPERHEROES.

Classes will include:

  • Cartooning with Marlin Lavanhar
  • Creating your Costume
  • Writing your Origin Story
  • Real Life UU SuperHeroes with Shannon Boston

Registration and full payment due July 15

Register at allsoulschurch.org/camp or in the family room on Sundays.

Enrollment is limited and on a first come, first served basis

UU SUPERHERO Comic Camp is for:

  • Campers entering grades 1-6 | $75
  • Counselors in Training (CITs) entering grades 7-10 | $25
    (Counselors in Training work directly with small groups and assist adult volunteers and Junior Counselors.)
  • Junior Counselors entering grades 11 & 12 and Adult Volunteers | free

Teachers, Junior Counselors, and CITs are required to attend a special training on Sunday, August 7, noon-5:00 p.m.

Scholarships: Scholarship priority is given to church members and those willing to volunteer in the Summer Camp Program.  To request a full or partial scholarship, please write a note to the Executive Director of Lifespan Religious Education, Shannon Boston, and enclose it with your registration form by July 1.

Camp Information:

  • Camp begins at 1 pm and ends at 4 pm daily.
  • Campers may arrive after 12:45 pm and must be picked up before 4:15 pm.
  • Snacks are provided – please let us know of allergies and special dietary concerns.

Adult Volunteers

All Souls Summer Camp is possible thanks to the committed adult volunteers who dedicate their time, talents, and energy to make this week a success. Full and part-time volunteers may enroll their children kindergarten and younger in childcare at no charge while they are volunteering. To sign up, email sboston@allsoulschurch.org. All Adult volunteers will submit an application and background check form.

Questions? Contact Shannon Boston, Executive Director of Lifespan Religious Education at sboston@allsoulschurch.org.

Youth

The Fifth Dimension (Middle & High School, Summer 2022)

There is a fifth dimension beyond that which is known toman. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timelessas infinity. It is the middle ground between light andshadow, between science and superstition, and it liesbetween the pit of man’s fears and the summit of hisknowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is anarea which we call the Twilight Zone.~ Opening Narration – Season 1 – Rod Serling

This summer, our middle and high school youth will experience “The Fifth Dimension,” a curriculum based on Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone.

About the Curriculum

GoalsCompeting for a youth’s attention can be difficult today. Widespreadtelevision viewing, video game playing, and internet surfing has created an environment where youth need visual stimulation to maintain interest. Pop culture can help to channel this environment into a learning opportunity, allowing youth to examine ethical and theological issues, while having fun.

In addition, pop culture can help youth to discuss important social issueswith peers. Talking about social issues with peers can be daunting,particularly if the youth lives and goes to school in a conservativeatmosphere and knows that their viewpoint is not necessarily shared by the majority of their peers. Referencing a television show, a movie, a song, or a website can help youth express their opinions to others.

This curriculum seeks to help participants:

  • Consider social issues and the ways in which our faith can help usunderstand our values.
  • Understand ways in which the right of conscience calls us to dowhat’s right, even if there are possible negative consequences.
  • Examine how our choices affect others around us, as well asourselves.
  • Explore how taking a stand is related to perspective and point ofview.

Rod SerlingRod Serling was one of American television’s most prolific writers and isbest known for his science fiction television series, The Twilight Zone. Hebelieved that the role of the writer was to “menace the public conscience.” Throughout his life Serling used radio, television, and film as “vehicles of social criticism”, often clashing with television executives and sponsors on issues ranging from censorship to racism to war.

Serling, who converted from Judaism to Unitarianism in college, beganwork as a television writer in the late 1940s. The early years of televisionoften found sponsors also serving as editors and censors, and Serling wasoften forced to change his scripts after corporate sponsors read them andfelt something was too controversial.

Serling believed “that of all the media, TV lends itself most beautifully topresenting a controversy.” He realized that he needed to create scriptsthat contained controversial messages and dialogues to get a point across. 

However, corporate sponsors had no desire to have their products matched with messages that might be viewed as negative or offensive. In 1959 Serling expressed his frustration: “I think it is criminal that we are not permitted to make dramatic note of social evils that exist, of controversial themes as they are inherent in our society.”

Frustrated by seeing his creative efforts divested of political statements and social issues, Serling began to consider the advantages of writing science fiction and fantasy. He learned that advertisers would routinely approve stories if they took place on fictional worlds, even if the story involved a controversial situation. Out of this realization came the  television series The Twilight Zone. This series, which ran from 1959-1964 gave Serling, and other writers, unprecedented artistic freedom. The show’s science fiction format would prove to not be controversial with sponsors, network executives, or the general public, and largely escaped censorship. 

The series won Serling three Emmy Awards, with Serling writing more than half of the 156 episodes produced. The Twilight Zone incorporated Serling’s liberal social views on racial relations, war, gender roles, addiction, extremism, violence, ageism, consumerism, industrialization and other social issues of the time.

The Twilight Zone gave voice to people who were often at the margins ofsociety. The show questioned power and who holds the power, withcorruption commonplace and no group immune to criticism. Viewers were asked to consider who had the power in society, whether power was used to help or oppress others, and how society might empower those who were shut out of power.

In 1967 Serling said, “I happen to think that the singular evil of our time is prejudice. It is from this evil that all other evils grow and multiply. In almost everything I’ve written there is a thread of this: a man’s seemingly palpable need to dislike someone other than himself.”

Middle School (6th-8th grades)

Huddle on Sundays – Our Middle School Group meets on Sundays from 10 to 11 am. This summer, join us for The Fifth Dimension, which uses episodes of The Twilight Zone to explore the issues of the day. This curriculum seeks to help participants:

  • Consider social issues and the ways in which our faith can help usunderstand our values.
  • Understand ways in which the right of conscience calls us to dowhat’s right, even if there are possible negative consequences.
  • Examine how our choices affect others around us, as well asourselves.
  • Explore how taking a stand is related to perspective and point ofview.
Coming of Age (9th grade)

Coming of Age – Our Freshmen will embark on a spiritual journey that will lead them to develop their own credos which they will deliver to the congregation on Coming of Age Sunday in the Spring of ‘23. 

High School (9th-12th grades)

Youth Huddle – Our High School Youth meet on Sunday afternoons from 11:30 am to 1 pm. This summer, join us for The Fifth Dimension, which uses episodes of The Twilight Zone to explore the issues of the day. This curriculum seeks to help participants:

  • Consider social issues and the ways in which our faith can help usunderstand our values.
  • Understand ways in which the right of conscience calls us to dowhat’s right, even if there are possible negative consequences.
  • Examine how our choices affect others around us, as well asourselves.
  • Explore how taking a stand is related to perspective and point ofview.
Youth Rock Band

Meets Sundays from 1 – 2:30 pm. Middle and high school youth, bring your instrument or your voice and let’s make some music!

Annual Events

Coming of Age Sunday

Each Spring we celebrate our 9th graders with this special Sunday service. As Unitarian Universalists, we give our youth the power and responsibility of sharing with us what they believe. Throughout the year, the 9th grade Coming of Age class learn to identify their values, understand their beliefs and learn more about themselves. The Coming of Age class culminates in the youth delivering their credo—their own, personal statement of belief that they want to share with the world. Be a part of this experience and support our youth in taking authority of their own spirituality and theology. You may even be inspired to better articulate your own beliefs!

Youth Sunday

Every year, the high school youth are given the honor and privilege to take over the sanctuary, the chancel and the pulpit. With this responsibility, they are able to show All Souls and the world what they are about, what matters to them, and to share their considerable wisdom. The youth will create, select, and perform every bit of the service; from music to prayer to our Seniors sharing their sermons. This inspiring service will fill you with hope.

OCCJ Teen Trialogues

Series conducted by OCCJ and including denominations across the city.